WSU Library System News

News & Updates in the Libraries

Link to licensed library resources through “Permalinks”

February 24th, 2015

Copyright guidelines for posting to Blackboard #fairuseweek

February 23rd, 2015

Documents are no longer copyright protected, and therefore can be freely used, if:

Published prior to 1923
Published between 1923 and 1963 without a copyright notice
Published between 1923 and 1963 with copyright notice on work and not renewed with the U.S. Copyright Office

Note: The lack of online documentation with the U.S. Copyright Office does not mean the copyright was not renewed.

Fair Use provisions and the Teach Act (2002) enables certain educational uses such as Blackboard posting, providing:

Limited portions of the work are made available at any one time
Use must be part of mediated instructional activities
Availability must take place during a period of time relevant to the context and duration of a typical class session
Use must be limited to students enrolled in the course
Do not share work or distribute via email
Ensure the Blackboard site is password protected
No posting of textbook materials typically purchased or acquired by students is allowed or considered fair use
No posting of protected materials developed specifically for online use
No use of copies are allowed that are not directly captured from the licensed original

We recommend:

Locate resources to use for coursework through full-text resources owned by the library system and link to them from Blackboard
Hyperlink to those resources from your digital syllabus
Reconsider the need to digitize a print resource and find a licensed full-text alternative
If you need to copy a resource:
Perform a fair use analysis, see: Fair Use Checklist
If deemed fair use, make a digital scan of a reasonable portion of the original
Ensure a copyright notice is on the digital copy
The University Libraries will assist obtaining content if a request for a digital copy is placed
You can only post documents obtained through a delivery system if you or the library system has purchased the licensed original (meaning it is owned and the copy comes from the owned copy)

All works not considered fair use require copyright permission. Obtaining copyright permission is the responsibility of the instructor posting on Blackboard.

We recommend:

Get permission from the rights-holder
www.copyright.com is the interface to seeking copyright permission

Taken from: copyright.wayne.edu/blackboard

Fair Use Week at Wayne State: February 23-27

February 22nd, 2015

Mark your calendars! Fair Use Week 2015—a community celebration of fair use coordinated by the Association of Research Libraries—will take place February 23–27.

What is Fair Use Week?
Each day teachers teach, students learn, researchers advance knowledge, and consumers access copyrighted information due to exemptions in copyright law, such as fair use in the United States or fair dealing in Canada and other jurisdictions. Fair use and fair dealing allow the use of copyrighted materials without permission from the copyright holder under certain circumstances. For libraries, educational institutions, and the public, the fair use doctrine is the most important limitation on the rights of the copyright owner—the “safety valve” of US copyright law.

Fair Use Week is an annual celebration of the doctrine of fair use and fair dealing. It celebrates the important role fair use plays in achieving the Constitutional purpose of intellectual property rights in the US: to promote the progress of science and the useful arts. The flexible nature of the fair use doctrine has permitted copyright to adapt to new technologies and changes. Similarly, in Canada, fair dealing is a critical right of the user intended to facilitate balance in copyright law and accommodate freedom of expression.

While Fair Use Week 2015 will be celebrated February 23–27, we believe that every week is fair use week. Indeed, fair use is employed on a daily basis by students, faculty, librarians, journalists, and all users of copyrighted material. Fair Use Week is simply a time to promote and discuss the opportunities presented by fair use, celebrate successful fair use stories, and explain the doctrine.

Is your use of material protected under the Fair Use doctrine? Try out the Fair Use Checklist to be sure #fairuseweek

February 22nd, 2015

http://copyright.wayne.edu/checklist.php

What is Fair Use Week?

Each day teachers teach, students learn, researchers advance knowledge and consumers access copyrighted information due to exemptions in copyright law, such as fair use in the United States or fair dealing in Canada and other jurisdictions. Fair use and fair dealing allow the use of copyrighted materials without permission from the copyright holder under certain circumstances. For libraries, educational institutions, and the public, the fair use doctrine is the most important limitation on the rights of the copyright owner—the “safety valve” of US copyright law.

Fair Use Week is an annual celebration of the doctrine of fair use and fair dealing. It celebrates the important role fair use plays in achieving the Constitutional purpose of intellectual property rights in the US: to promote the progress of science and the useful arts. The flexible nature of the fair use doctrine has permitted copyright to adapt to new technologies and changes. Similarly, in Canada, fair dealing is a critical right of the user intended to facilitate balance in copyright law and accommodate freedom of expression.

While Fair Use Week 2015 will be celebrated February 23–27, we believe that every week is fair use week. Indeed, fair use is employed on a daily basis by students, faculty, librarians, journalists, and all users of copyrighted material. Fair Use Week is simply a time to promote and discuss the opportunities presented by fair use, celebrate successful fair use stories, and explain the doctrine.

Wayne State University Archivist Casey Westerman selected for 2015 Archives Leadership Institute

February 10th, 2015

Wayne State University Archivist Casey Westerman was recently selected as a participant in the 2015 Archives Leadership Institute (ALI) at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa. Participants were selected for the 2015 ALI program based on their exceptional leadership skills and potential, the ability to influence change within the archival field, a strong commitment to the archival profession, demonstrated professional organizational involvement and service, a collaborative and innovative spirit and representation or support of diversity within the profession.

Westerman has been with the Reuther Library since 2011, serving as the University Archivist in charge of the records of Wayne State University. Originally from Kankakee, Ill., Westerman received his bachelor’s degree in history and philosophy of science and his master’s degree in library science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a second master’s degree in English literature from the University of Georgia. Previous to his role at Wayne State, Westerman was the processing archivist at the Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives at Cornell University.

ALI is a program funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, a statutory body affiliated with the National Archives and Records Administration, and is being hosted at Luther College for the years 2013-15. The ALI 2015 will take place from June 14 to 20 and will provide advanced training for 25 innovative leaders, giving them the knowledge and tools to transform the archival profession in practice, theory and attitude. The week-long leadership intensive includes five elements: a post-intensive practicum, a practices workshop at the annual meeting of the Society of American Archivists, thematic projects and an ALI alumni networking salon. The core approach will intertwine strategic and advanced leadership thinking with a clear and purposeful archival curriculum that includes project management, strategic visioning and human resource development, strategies for born digital resources and advocacy and outreach.

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission, the granting agency of the National Archives and Records Administration, supports projects that promote the preservation and use of America’s documentary heritage and the continuing development of professional skills for archivists,records managers and historical editors. First funded in 2008, the Archives Leadership Institute seeks to bring to tomorrow’s leaders the insights and understanding necessary for increasing public use and appreciation of archives.

www.archivesleadershipinstitute.org

Class of 2016-2017 Library Resources

January 28th, 2015


Visit the Shiffman Medical Library Years One & Two Timesaver to access an extensive collection of electronic textbooks, mobile apps and resources such as Case Files and Self-Assessment material in AccessMedicine, 3D models and visualizations in Anatomy-TV and view recorded experiments in the Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE).

Click here http://guides.lib.wayne.edu/somyearone and don’t forget to bookmark the site to quickly access:

Shiffman Medical Library
Wayne State University
Mazurek Medical Education Commons
320 E. Canfield St.
Detroit, MI 48201
1-313- 577-1088
askmed@wayne.edu

February 18 | Discover your digital library! eFair and used book sale, UGL atrium

January 17th, 2015

On February 18, the Wayne State University Libraries will be holding its first-ever eFair, a library service expo that will introduce users of the library to some of our major digital, online and “e” resources, as well as new innovations in technology. Users can collect giveaways at each station and those who visit all 5 stations will receive a Library System tote bag—make sure to pick up a punch card at the first station that you visit! See the flyer below for more details.

Used Book Sale
Due to student feedback and popular demand, we’ll also be holding a winter used book sale alongside the eFair. This sale will be a slightly smaller version of the large used book sale that we normally hold in the fall. Find anything from textbooks to fiction at prices even college students can afford: $2 for hardcover books and $1 for paperback books. We’ll also be offering a special collection of unique books at various price points. Cash only.

New Year Brings New Updates at the UGL

January 9th, 2015

During the holiday break, the David Adamany Undergraduate Library underwent many improvements in preparation for the new semester.

The new carpet throughout the first floor and the Community Room is the UGL’s most noticeable improvement. We’ve also removed and repositioned existing furniture and added new furniture on the second floor near the Wayne State University Presidents Portrait Gallery. In addition, the desk that previously stood to the left of the UGL entrance has been removed and will soon house kiosks for users to perform quick searches of the library’s website and internet. In the Extended Study Center, the older iMacs were replaced by 32 new Dell pc computers and we added 24 electrical and USB outlets throughout the first floor. Finally, based on feedback from the Student Senate, the first floor lounge area was completely reconfigured to include booths, a bar-style counter against the back wall and fresh paint.

Have a look at the before and after photos below and stop by to check it out in person!

The Revolutionary E-Book That Never Got a Chance To Be Read

January 9th, 2015

From Mental Floss (http://mentalfloss.com/article/61005/revolutionary-e-book-never-got-chance-be-read):

In 1972, two scientists excitedly announced the development of a new technology that, according to a New York Times page one story, caused a “sensation in…publishing circles.” It was predicted to perhaps “revolutionize the publication of books,” and an information-processing specialist for the Navy said it could “eliminate central files in large bureaucracies” and “‘re-make’ the information handling industry.”

The magic technology was a new kind of microfilm, and it didn’t do any of those things. However, the devices that did manage to successfully conquer the publishing industry and revolutionize the way we handle information wound up looking pretty similar to this gadget from the early ’70s.

The microfilm, which was invented by Adnan Waly and George J. Yevick, stored 625 pages of text per sheet and could be displayed one page at a time on a portable device. This machine, which looked somewhat like a modern e-book, was “powered either by a portable battery unit or by plugging into an electric outlet.”

The process of uploading the books to the microfilm sheets involved photographing the pages through thousands of tiny lenses (like a “fly’s eye”), and, had the reader hit the market, each sheet would have cost around 25 cents to buy. The inventors imagined cigarette machine-like dispensers placed around the planet that would sell books for use on their little handheld reader. Waly and Yevick hoped that it would become a “people’s technology” and make the world’s information “cheap enough for almost any human being” to access.

The invention also had an advantage over plenty of modern tablet computers. According to one of Waly and Yevick’s original patents, “this projection display device has proved to be surprisingly immune to image wash-out by ambient light” based on tests performed in brightly lit rooms. (Their technology would later be cited in patents for early LCD displays.)

The microfilm and corresponding reader never caught on, and the invention faded away after that first major story on the front page of the New York Times. The parallel development of early personal computers by companies like XEROX overshadowed Waly and Yevick’s little machine and likely prevented it from ever getting off the ground.

Even the most clever technologies that perfectly predict the flow of modern development often wind up as footnotes to footnotes in the stories of other inventions, barely even allowed the opportunity to be made obsolete.

Wayne State Word Warriors release annual top 10 words worth reviving

January 7th, 2015

In May, the words “hashtag,” “selfie” and “tweep” were among 150 new words and definitions added to Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, proof of how our culture continues to expand our communication.

Still, we think some old words deserve a bit more love.

As part of its initiative to draw attention to some of the English language’s most expressive — yet regrettably neglected — words, Wayne State University has released its annual list of the year’s top 10 words that deserve to be used more often in conversation and prose.

Now beginning its seventh year, Wayne State’s Word Warriors series promotes words especially worthy of retrieval from the linguistic closet.

The Word Warriors’ extensive list is composed of submissions from both administrators of the website as well as the public; logophiles worldwide have seen their favorite words brought back from the brink of obsolescence at wordwarriors.wayne.edu. New entries are posted there, as well as on Twitter and Facebook, each week.

“The English language has more words in its lexicon than any other,” says Jerry Herron, dean of WSU’s Irvin D. Reid Honors College and a member of the website’s editorial board. “By making use of the repertoire available to us, we expand our ability to communicate clearly and help make our world a more interesting place. Bringing these words back into everyday conversation is just another way of broadening our horizons.”

And now, the Word Warriors’ 2015 list of eminently useful words that should be brought back to enrich our language:

Caterwaul
A shrill howling or wailing noise.
As the storm raged on, the caterwaul from the wind as it whipped through the trees kept me from getting any sleep.

Concinnity
The skillful and harmonious arrangement or fitting together of the different parts of something.
As the choir sang in the vast cathedral, I couldn’t help but marvel at the concinnity of Handel’s “Messiah.”

Flapdoodle
Nonsense.
His talk show was a collection of flapdoodle about politics and conspiracies.

Knavery
A roguish or mischievous act.
His presidency was founded on malice, lies and knavery.

Melange
A mixture of different things.
Her painting was a melange of colors and shapes that dazzled the eyes.

Obambulate
To walk about.
During our vacation, my wife and I would wake up early and obambulate around the empty beach.

Opsimath
A person who begins to learn or study only late in life.
Uninterested in anything intellectual for most of his life, my father turned into an opsimath after retirement, attending lectures and always carrying a book.

Philistine
A person who is hostile or indifferent to culture and the arts, or who has no understanding of them.
Ever the philistine, my dad never understood the joy I found in foreign films and classical music.

Rapscallion
A mischievous person.
April Fools’ Day was better than Christmas for the young rapscallion.

Subtopia
Monotonous urban sprawl of standardized buildings.
As the city grew outward, our charming small town became a subtopia overrun with franchise pharmacies and strip malls.

Taken from: http://media.wayne.edu/2015/01/05/wayne-state-word-warriors-release-annual-top-1?utm_source=link&utm_medium=email-54ac0978bc705&utm_campaign=Today%40Wayne+-+Tuesday%2C+January+6%2C+2015&utm_content=)