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WSU Library System News

News & Updates in the Libraries

Archive for September, 2014

UGL hosts traveling NASA exhibit “Here, There, Everywhere” through September

Thursday, September 11th, 2014

Beginning September 8 and running through the end of the month, the David Adamany Undergraduate Library will be hosting “Here, There, Everywhere,” a traveling NASA exhibit that illustrates how familiar phenomena on Earth and across the Universe are connected by basic physical laws.

The main feature behind this Here, There, Everywhere (HTE) is a series of spectacular visual comparisons that span from the human scale on Earth to some of the largest structures in the cosmos. The panels in each of the exhibit topics give examples, with explanatory text, of the same physical process occurring on vastly different scales.

There are six subjects in the HTE exhibit. The topics covered in the exhibit include shadows, wind, electric discharge, bow waves, lensing, and the collisional excitation of atoms.

“Our daily experiences reveal much about how our world works, and thinking about everyday examples helps form our basic understanding of physics,” said Patrick Slane, an astrophysicist involved with the project. “This exhibit will help show that these laws of physics have universal relevance.”

HTE was conceived, designed and generated by a team at the Chandra X-ray Center, which is part of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusettes. The Chandra X-ray Observatory is NASA’s flagship mission for X-ray astronomy and one of the “Great Observatories” along with the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the now de-orbited Compton Gamma Ray Observatory.

For more information about the exhibit, visit http://hte.si.edu/

September 17: Astrophysics lecture Neutron Stars: humanity in a sugar cube

Wednesday, September 10th, 2014

In a lecture to accompany the “Here, There, Everywhere” NASA traveling exhibit that is currently on display in the UGL, Wayne State University astronomer Ed Cackett will deliver a lecture called “Neutron Stars: Humanity in a Sugar Cube,” on September 17 at 2:30 p.m. in the Community Room of the David Adamany Undergraduate Library.

Cackett will discuss neutron stars, a type of stellar remnant that can result from the gravitational collapse of a massive star during a supernova event. Neutron stars and black holes are among the most exotic objects in the universe; studying neutron stars and black holes gives us access to exotic realms that we can’t explore on Earth. A lump of neutron star matter the size of a sugar cube would weigh as much as all humanity, and the stars have magnetic fields a trillion times Earth’s. Since we can’t reproduce such conditions in laboratories, we have to observe neutron stars with telescopes to figure out their properties.

Cackett is an assistant professor in Wayne State’s physics and astronomy departments. He received his Ph.D. from the University of St Andrews in the United Kingdom and held postdoctoral fellowships at the University of Michigan and University of Cambridge, before joining the Wayne State University faculty in January 2012. He recently was awarded a National Science Foundation Early Career Development Award, the agency’s most prestigious award for junior faculty, for his project to understand the process of accretion in neutron stars.

The lecture is free and open to the public and the “Here, There, Everywhere” exhibit will be on display through September. For more information, contact Wayne State Librarian Jim Van Loon at cv3901@wayne.edu

Detroit artist Gilda Snowden dead at 60

Tuesday, September 9th, 2014

Taken from the Metro Times:

Detroit artist Gilda Snowden has died due to a sudden heart failure, according to her family. She was 60.

A post on Snowden’s Facebook account today broke the news:

Hello everyone, our family would like to inform you that as of this morning, Gilda passed away at Receiving Hospital due to sudden heart failure. We are just as shocked and confused as you are, and would greatly appreciate it if you gave us a little while to gather ourselves and make preparations. We are all immensely grateful for your condolences and well wishes, and we will make sure to keep you posted. Thank you again, we are blessed to have such a caring and loving community around us.

A graduate of Cass Tech High school, Snowden majored in fashion design. She started at Wayne State University in 1972 as a sociology major, but switched to art by the end of her four years. She earned her BFA in Advertising Design and Painting, MA in Painting, and MFA in Painting from Wayne State University by 1979, and started teaching for the university that same year. By 1985, she was a professor at the College for Creative Studies, where she was still employed at the time of her death.

Snowden worked primarily as an abstract painter, heavily inspired by artists of the Cass Corridor scene. Though her medium changed throughout the years, she loved the immediacy of paint — always working on the floor, and never with an easel. “I want them to be layered, gritty, grungy, beautiful,” she told us regarding her work.

She says that she chose to paint because of its speed. “I want to see answers immediately,” she told us.

Snowden was the subject of a retrospective at Artwork Oakland University Art Gallery in late 2013.

She was interviewed in 2011 for the Cass Corridor Documentation Project, a collaboration between the WSU Libraries and University Art Collection. In tribute, her oral history is presented here in audio and text formats:
http://elibrary.wayne.edu/record=b4307702~S47

University Libraries Book Sale POSTPONED to September 24 due to weather forecasts predicting severe storms

Tuesday, September 9th, 2014

Due to weather forecasts predicting severe storms, and in line with the postponement of the University Student Organizations Day and Student Services Fair, the University Libraries will also be postponing the annual book sale until Wednesday, September 24 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Please stay safe with these tips for driving in the rain

Wayne State Shiffman Medical Library director appointed to National Library of Medicine Board of Regents

Tuesday, September 2nd, 2014

The Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Sylvia Mathews Burwell, recently appointed Sandra Martin, director of Wayne State University’s Shiffman Medical Library to the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine (NLM). The appointment runs through August 2018.

“The Wayne State Libraries are proud that the NLM and the Secretary of Health and Human Services have recognized Sandra Martin’s deep knowledge and expertise in medical librarianship,” said Sandra Yee, dean of the Wayne State University Libraries.

“We are pleased that through Sandra’s leadership on the board, the Wayne State Libraries will make a significant contribution to the health information available to the nation’s citizens.”

A life-long Detroiter, Martin received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Wayne State University. Prior to her position as director of Shiffman Medical Library, she served as the assistant director of Shiffman and supervisor of library and A/V services at Harper Hospital in Detroit. Throughout her career Martin has held committee positions at local, state, regional and national levels, including the Medical Library Association, Association of Academic Health Science Libraries and the National Library of Medicine.

The NLM Board of Regents meets three times per year to advise, consult with and make recommendations to the HHS Secretary, the director of the NIH and the director of the NLM. The Board provides input on matters regarding library materials collected, services provided and research conducted by the NLM, including research and development done at the National Center for Biotechnology Information, which maintains PubMed, MedlinePlus, genome databases and many other resources heavily used by scientists throughout the world. The Board also reviews and makes recommendations about grant applications, bioinformatics training programs and contracts funded by the Library.

Part of the National Institutes of Health, the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland, is the world’s largest biomedical library. As a developer of electronic information services, it delivers trillions of bytes of data to millions of users every day.

The Wayne State University Library System consists of the university’s six libraries: The David Adamany Undergraduate Library, the Purdy/Kresge Library, the Shiffman Medical Library, the Arthur Neef Law Library, the Science and Engineering Library, and the Reuther Library and the School for Library and Information Science.

Wayne State University is a premier institution offering more than 350 academic programs through 13 schools and colleges to nearly 28,000 students.